Course Descriptions

English/Language Arts

English/Language Arts
Students are required to earn four units of English credit. (One each year of high school.)
Sequence:
English I → English II Regular or Honors → English III Regular or Honors → English IV Regular, Honors, or Dual Enrollment
English I:
A course designed for students who may or may not be college bound. The course includes the development of appropriate skills in reading comprehension, grammar and language usage, composition, vocabulary development, study techniques, library use, and literature.
English II:
English II is in many ways a continuation of English I, with a commitment to improving the student’s writing process, grammar instruction, and readings in a variety of literary works. English II focuses on the study of literature by utilizing texts from all different time periods including modern literature. This course will use multiple literary genres such as short stories, poetry, and novels. A strong emphasis will be placed on grammar and vocabulary in order to help cultivate the students’ writing skills. The students will also focus on persuasive writing and literary analysis/expository writing. This course will also include formal and informal oral presentations and independent novel study.
English II Honors:
English II Honors is designed to prepare students for college-level work. It is similar to English II but pushes the students to excel through a more in-depth study of the literature that is covered and through longer and more challenging writing assignments. The course introduces students to English as a scholarly discipline featuring critical analysis and careful attention to language. As readers and writers, students consider literary texts from a variety of perspectives while they develop their own writing techniques.
English III:
This course is an overview of American Literature from the country’s beginnings through modern times. It also emphasizes writing, both in preparation for the TCAP Writing Assessment and as it relates to research methods. Instruction includes reading, composition practice/theory, group work, computer lab and library introductions and research.
English III Honors:
This course is an overview of American Literature from the country’s beginnings through modern times. It also emphasizes writing, both in preparation for the TCAP Writing Assessment and as it relates to research methods. In addition, students are challenged to read four to five American novels, do advanced research practices, and to incorporate creative models of learning.
English IV:
English IV is a comprehensive course requiring the student to use the reading, writing, and cognitive-thinking skills developed in previous English classes. Students will establish a solid foundation in reading and writing critically. English IV also provides a chronological survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the medieval period to present literary pieces. Focus will be on classis British literature/authors such as Beowulf, Sir Thomas Malory, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare (Macbeth), Charles Dickens, and other noted English writers and their works. Students will complete two formal research papers following MLA guidelines for one and APA guidelines for the other.
English IV Honors:
English IV Honors is an extension of regular English IV. The course includes all the basics of English IV along with a focus on college-preparatory writing that emphasizes critical analysis. Students are also required to do independent reading on British novels such asLord of the Flies, A Christmas Carol, Jane Eyre, Silas Marner, The Heart of Darkness, Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, and/or Pride and Prejudice. The class is designed to meet the needs of the college-bound student.
Dual Enrollment English:
This course is taught by a professor of Lincoln Memorial University and is College Freshman Composition. Successful completion results in college credit and will also satisfy the high school English IV requirement. In order to enroll in this course, students must be accepted for enrollment by LMU and thus meet ACT and GPA requirements. Students are responsible for the purchase of books needed.
Language Arts (Humanities) Electives:
Bible Literacy:
The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire an understanding and appreciation of the Bible’s major ideas, historical/geographical contexts, and literary forms. The course will include the study of the Bible in its historical, sociological, and cultural contexts, and its impact on later cultures, societies, and religions.
Creative Writing:
A one unit course for students who have an interest in studying and writing in the genres of poetry, drama, short stories, and nonfiction. The curriculum includes the study of genres, the students’ personal examples of the genres, and their development of a portfolio.
Creative Writing II:
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed Creative Writing I.
A one-unit course for students who wish to pursue further the art of creative writing, concentrating especially on poetry, short stories, non-fiction, and screen writing. Works of great authors are examines and modeled, with a view to enhancing the students’ own works. This class is conducted as a workshop with both teacher- and peer-conferencing, an important part of the process, the end result being a significant portfolio of student work.
Creative Writing III:
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed Creative Writing I and II.
Etymology/Mythology:
A one unit course for students in grades 10-12. Curriculum includes a study of etymology, vocabulary development, classical mythology, and allusions found in literature, music, and the arts.
English Skills:
Serving as an intensive reading intervention for students who enter ninth grade below grade level in reading/language arts skills, the goals of this course will be the success of each student by making improvements in overall, individual reading ability. These goals will be met by directly addressing the individual needs of each student through differentiated instruction, adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction, including whole/small group and one to one as needed. In addition to pre and post testing of intervention program, student success will also be measured by a pre and post test of the Tennessee ninth grade Language Arts English I Instructional Standards.
Yearbook:
Yearbook is a one-year elective that produces the school yearbook in a traditional print form. The year begins each summer with an intensive three-day journalism seminar at Maryville College where the students will design the theme and cover of the book. Members of the staff are expected to have a high level of maturity and the ability to work independently. This is a wonderful opportunity for members of the team to exercise their creativity, while developing new skills in basic graphic design, photography, marketing, copy writing, page layout, and project management. Creating the yearbook is a fun process and the end result of all the effort is a product of which the students can be proud.
Science
Students are required to earn credit in Biology, Chemistry or Physics and one additional lab science.
Sequence:
Physical Science→ Biology I→ Chemistry I→ Biology II, Chemistry II, Anatomy and Physiology, or Physics
Agriscience is also a CTE course that can be taken prior to Biology I or as the beginning course for any of the Agricultural Program of Studies. (See C TE Programs of Study.)
Physical Science:
Physical science is a course that explores the relationship between matter and energy. Students will investigate force and motion, structure and properties of matter, and interactions of matter and energy through inquiry learning, hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies, group activities, and direct instruction. The use of relevance is used to increase comprehension and application of knowledge. Students use available technology to investigate forces and motion, the chemical and physical properties of matter, the interaction of matter and energy within the natural world and the forms and properties of energy. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the entire course. This course provides the knowledge, prerequisite skills, and habits of mind needed for problem solving and ethical decision-making about matters of scientific and technological concern, as well as, a basic foundation for advanced studies in chemistry and physics and personal career choices.
Biology I:
Biology I is a science course that investigates the relationship between structure and function from molecules to organisms and systems, the interdependence and interactions of biotic and abiotic components of the environment, and mechanisms that maintain continuity and lead to changes in populations over time. Students explore biological concepts through an inquiry approach.
Chemistry I:
Recommended pre-requisites: Physical Science, Algebra I
Chemistry I is a laboratory science course in which students investigate the composition of matter and the physical and chemical changes it undergoes. Students use scientific processing skills to study the fundamental structure of atoms, the way atoms combine to form compounds, and the interactions between matter and energy. Students explore chemistry concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards fro Inquiry, Mathematics, and Technology and Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Atomic Structure, Matter and Energy, and Interactions of Matter.
Biology II:
Recommended pre-requisites: Biology I and Chemistry I
Biology II is a laboratory science course in which students engage in an in-depth study of the principles of biology. This course emphasizes internal and external anatomical structures and their functions, the environmental interaction of organisms, processes of living things, mechanisms that maintain homeostasis, biodiversity, and changes in life forms over time. Students explore biological concepts through an inquiry approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Technology and Engineering and Mathematics are taught in the context of the content standards for Cells, Interdependence, Flow of Matter and Energy, Heredity, Biodiversity and Change, Comparative Anatomy and Physiology, and Botany.
Chemistry II:
Recommended pre-requisites: Chemistry I and Algebra II
Chemistry II is a laboratory science course that builds on topics introduced in Chemistry I. This course investigates chemical bonding and how kinetic molecular theory and intermolecular forces explain the physical and chemical characteristics of matter. Additional aspects of chemical reactions including limiting reactants, percent yield, equilibrium, reaction rates, and thermochemistry are considered. Students explore chemistry concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry, Mathematics, and Technology and Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Structure of Matter, States of Matter, and Reactions.
Chemistry AP (Advanced Placement):
Pre-requisites: Chemistry I and II, Algebra I and II; current enrollment in Advanced Math or Calculus is strongly suggested.
A first-year college level Chemistry II course which follows a syllabus of College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement Program. The AP Chemistry curriculum is designed to prepare students to take the College Board AP Chemistry test given in May of each year. Students may be required to attend additional classroom or laboratory sessions beyond the usual five periods per week.
Human Anatomy and Physiology:
Recommended pre-requisites: Biology I and Chemistry I
Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory science course that includes an in-depth study of the body systems that maintain homeostasis from anatomical, physiological, and histological perspectives. Students explore anatomical and physiological concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Embedded standards for Inquiry and Technology and Engineering are taught in the context of the content standards for Anatomical Orientation, Protection, Support, and Movement, Integration and Regulation, Transportation, Absorption and Excretion, and Reproduction, Growth, and Development.
Physics:
Physics is a college preparatory class designed to provide an overview of the basic topics of Physics. These topics will be explored using an algebraic mathematical approach to explain the basic phenomena of our physical world. A combination of laboratory experimentation to get some “hands-on” observations of physics principles and mathematical “problem solving” to explore the predictions of actual behavior in real world circumstances will accompany the multimedia explanation and illustration of the physics principles we will be studying. Because the course is highly mathematical and requires familiarity with advanced algebra, trigonometry, geometry, and graphical analysis, the successful completion of Algebra II or an equivalent course is strongly recommended.
Mathematics
Students are required to earn four units of credit in Mathematics and be enrolled in a math course every year. All four credits must be Algebra I or above. Students who have not earned at least a 19 on the math component of the ACT will take a course called Bridges math rather than Finite Math.
Students who are interested in a mathematics or science major in college need to take Pre-Calculus rather than the Finite Math course.
Students who begin high school with a score below the college readiness benchmark standard in mathematics on the Explore exam need to begin with Algebra IA. Students must take both Algebra IA and Algebra IB in the same academic year.
Sequence:
Algebra I→ Geometry or Technical Geometry→ Algebra II→ Pre-Calculus, Bridges Math, or Finite Math
Algebra IA SWD:
Students in this course will perform operations with rational and irrational numbers, solve linear equations, graph on the horizontal number line and coordinate plane, interpret patterns found in tables and graphs, and determine measures of central tendency given a set of data. Students will use computer tutorials to enhance their learning of the topics studied.
Pre-Algebra
This is designed for ninth grade students who enter high school unprepared to begin Algebra I. This course will explore and apply concepts, processes, and skills essential to successfully completing the high school graduation requirement. The class is spent integrating pre-algebra and introductory algebra skills. More time is devoted to skill development than is possible in the one-term Algebra I class. It also emphasizes topics including in a traditional Algebra I course: properties of the number system, linear and quadratic functions, inequalities, operations on real numbers and polynomials, exponents and radicals.
Algebra I:
Algebra I is the beginning level high-school mathematics course in which the following standards are discussed: mathematical processes; numbers and operations; algebraic functions; geometric functions and measurements; and data analysis, statistics and probability.
Geometry:
Pre-requisite: Algebra I
This course is a survey of the fundamental and advanced concepts of plane geometry and related topics in three-dimensional geometry, coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry. The content begins with necessary introductory vocabulary and continues with algebraic and geometric proofs based on an axiomatic system. Applications of the theorems are utilized gain to help students gasp an understanding of how geometry is used if different careers. Successful completion prepares you for further work in Algebra II.
Algebra II:
Pre-requisite: Geometry or Algebra I
This Course extends the topics first seen in Algebra I and provides advanced skills in algebraic operations. Additionally, linear and quadratic functions and relations, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, graphing, and sequences and series will be expanded.
Bridge Math:
This course is to be taken by students who score below 19 on the ACT.
In alignment with the Developmental Studies Program for Mathematics (DSPM) outcomes, the curriculum standards have been organized into groups of mathematical skills. Certain mathematical skills are required in order to prepare a DSPM student for college level mathematics courses. However, these particular skills should be developed in an environment that promotes learning beyond skill and drill techniques. These new skills should be introduced in conjunction with appropriate mathematical concepts and should be related to previous learning. Applications of these skills should play a principal role in the learning and assessment process. Technology should be used to strategically enhance the student’s understanding of core concepts via the use of multiple problem solving strategies.
Senior Finite Math:
This course is designed to prepare students for both college and the workplace. Students choosing this course would be less likely to enroll in a STEM Calculus course upon entering college. However, this course will provide a foundation for students entering a business application Calculus course or other general education mathematics course.
Pre-Calculus:
Pre calculus is an advanced mathematics course that uses meaningful problems and appropriate technologies to build upon previously learned mathematical concepts to develop the underpinnings of calculus.
Calculus:
Calculus is an advanced mathematics course that uses meaningful problems and appropriate technology to develop concepts and applications related to continuity and discontinuity of functions and differentiation, and integration.
Social Studies
Students must earn credit in U.S. Government, U.S. History, World History, Economics and Personal Finance.
United States Government:
This high school government course focuses on the United States’ founding principles and beliefs. This course will focus on the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute US politics. Students will gain an analytical perspective on government and politics in the US by both studying the general concepts used to interpret US politics and by analyzing specific examples. Students will study the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. The six social studies standards of essential content knowledge (Culture; Economics; Geography; Governance; History; and Individuals, groups and interactions) and four process skills will be integrated for instructional purposes. Students will learn how to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to US government and politics and will write extensively to perfect their essay writing skills and critical thinking skills. This course will satisfy the US Government requirement for the diploma.
United States History:
In United States History, students study the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. The six social studies standards of essential content knowledge (Culture; Economics; Geography; Governance; History; and Individuals, groups and interactions) and process skills are integrated for instructional purposes. Students will utilize different methods that historians use to interpret the past, including points of view and historical context.
World History:
In World History High School, students study the history of humankind with a more concentrated focus from the Renaissance to present day. The six social studies standards of essential content knowledge and four process skills are integrated for instructional purposes. Students will utilize different methods that historians use to interpret the past, including points of view and historical context.
Dual Enrollment World History:
This course is taught by a professor of Lincoln Memorial University. Successful completion results in college credit and will also satisfy the high school World History requirement. In order to enroll in this course, students must be accepted for enrollment by LMU and thus meet ACT and GPA requirements. Students are responsible for the purchase of books needed.
Economics:
This course will give the students a greater understanding of economics ranging from the viewpoint of the individual consumer or small business owner to the global economy. The course will study the law of supply and demand, forms of business, labor unions, government finances and influence on the economy, money and prices, inflation and deflation cycles. The course relates history and politics to the study of economics. Students examine the study of how people, businesses, and governments choose to use resources with integration of the six social studies standards of essential content knowledge (Culture; Economics; Geography; Governance; History; and Individuals, groups and interactions) and four process skills for instructional purposes.
Personal Finance:
Personal Finance is a course designed to inform students about how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real-world topics covered include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as, saving and investing.
Fine Arts Electives:
Instrumental Music (Symphonic Band):
Students enrolled in Symphonic Band will be expected to learn to play a wind instrument or percussion. Students in this class will also study the history of band music, performance practices and music theory through playing concert band literature and pep band music. Students in symphonic band will be expected to perform at all home basketball games (pep band) and give a spring concert in early May (concert literature). Additional performances are at the discretion of the director.
Instrumental Music (Techniques of Winds and Percussions-Band):
This course focuses on the techniques of learning to play an instrument. As a performance based class, students can expect to be graded on their performances, as well as, daily work, tests and quizzes, and materials check.
Visual Art I, II, III:
Students in visual arts courses will create, evaluate, and research the historical context of works of art. The students will apply various media, techniques, and processes in the creation and analysis of artworks. Students, through practice and sequential study, will strive to achieve technical mastery in the areas of art production, art criticism, aesthetics, and art history. As students progress through courses in the area of visual art, they will develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. These skills are gleaned from the study of ideas, concepts, issues, and knowledge related to the visual arts.
Vocal Music:
Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.
Theatre Arts I:
This course is intended as a general introduction to the technical aspects of theater combined with the fundamentals of video production. Elements to be considered will include cinematography, performance, edited image, screenwriting and sound. This class emphasizes hands-on production experience, using digital video in groups of four to five students.
Theatre Arts II:
A continuation of Theatre Arts I. Students will learn the basic principles of stage and film directing, from the breakdown of the script as the first stage of directing, to the analysis of the script from the director’s point of view. Students must produce three short “films” to present to the class. Focus is on directing film and film crews.
Foreign Language:
All students are to earn two credits in the same foreign language unless students who know they will not attend college and their parents waive this for more courses in their elective focus (program of study).
Spanish I:
The student will be introduced to the basic communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the Spanish language, while also be given the opportunity to acquire knowledge of foreign culture. In the process learning common vocabulary—such as numbers, colors, weather, time, family, clothing, body, foods, and house-hold items—students will also be learning about the culture and customs of Spanish-speaking nations across the globe. By the study of Spanish, the student not only learns how other people express themselves, but also how they live and think.
This first year of basic language instruction is a textbook based proficiency course. Classroom activities are augmented through a comprehensive cultural approach to the Spanish-speaking world, with activities ranging from music, art, film, theater, food, and community service. Active participation in class, daily preparation, and memorization is essential to acquire basic communication skills to express needs and wants. As with all other courses in this program, this course seeks to bring student achievement into alignment with the standards of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.
Spanish II:
The student will be able to further develop their communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the Spanish language, while also be given the opportunity to acquire knowledge of foreign culture. In the process learning common vocabulary—such as numbers, colors, weather, time, fiestas, family, sports, clothing, body, foods, and house-hold items—students will also be learning about the culture and customs of Spanish-speaking nations across the globe. By the study of Spanish, the student not only learns how other people express themselves, but also how they live and think.
During the second year of study, students will continue to study grammar and vocabulary; increase the use of Spanish for active communication; read short stories, articles, dialogues, and literary works; write stories, compositions, and longer dialogues which employ learned grammatical concepts and vocabulary; recite dialogues, speeches, stories, and poetry; and study Hispanic geography and culture through lectures, readings, and films. Students who take this course will be prepared for the upper division courses because of the breadth and depth of the material covered.
Wellness:
Advanced PE/Advanced Strength and Conditioning and Weightlifting:
The purpose of these courses is for the student to make strength and conditioning gains while developing self-discipline and a positive attitude. Both health and skill related activities will be emphasized. Some of these skills are muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, speed, agility, coordination and power. In addition, proper nutrition will be included in the instructional phase of the class. The student who signs up for these classes should be self-motivated and have a strong work ethic. These classes could be open to students who may not have a chance to complete the additional one-half credit in Physical Education needed to meet that graduation requirement.
Lifetime Wellness:
The content of the course includes seven standards: Disease Prevention and Control, Nutrition, Substance Use and Abuse, Mental/Emotional/Social Health, Sexuality and Family Life, Safety and First Aid, and Personal Fitness. Each content area is addressed in a classroom and/or physical activity setting. Personal fitness and nutrition should be emphasized and integrated throughout the course. Students are provided opportunities to explore how content areas are interrelated. Students acquire knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions regarding their health and well being throughout their lifetime. There will also be guest speakers coming in during the term to further discuss certain topics.
CTE Programs of Study (Elective Focus)
Career Management Success:
(This course in the beginning course in numerous Programs of Study.)
Career Management Success is a core course for career clusters. The course provides students with tools for achieving success in their academic, work, and personal lives.  Course content emphasizes the basic skills and knowledge needed for employment success, as identified by industry and supported by relevant national standards. All course content is presented in a real-world context, providing concrete opportunities for developing personal and career goals, effective communication skills, teamwork abilities, and successful work attitudes. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to complete the Professional Development Program Level I and Level II of Skills USA or other degree programs in other career and technical youth organizations.
Agriculture:
Agriscience:
Recommended for ninth grade students.
Agriscience is an introductory laboratory science course that prepares students for biology, subsequent science and agriculture courses, and postsecondary study. This course helps students understand the important role that agricultural science and technology serves in the 21st century. In addition, it serves as the first course for all programs of study in the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Cluster.
Small Animal Science:
Small Animal Science is an applied course in animal science and care for students interested in learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or agriculture professions. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different groups of small animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry.
Large Animal Science:
Large Animal Science is an applied course in veterinary and animal science for students interested in learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or agriculture professions. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different groups of large animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry.
Veterinary Science:
Veterinary Science is an advanced course in animal science and care for students interested in learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or agriculture professions. This course covers principles of health and disease, basic animal care and nursing, clinical and laboratory procedures, and additional industry-related career and leadership knowledge and skills.
Principles of Ag Mechanics:
Principles of Agricultural Mechanics is a course introducing students to basic skills and knowledge in construction and land management for both rural and urban environments. This course covers topics including project management, basic engine and motor mechanics, land surveying, irrigation and drainage, agricultural structures, and basic metalworking techniques.
Agricultural Power and Equipment:
Agricultural Power and Equipment is an applied-knowledge course in agricultural engineering with special emphasis on laboratory activities involving small engines, tractors, and agricultural equipment. The standards in this course address navigation, maintenance, repair, and overhaul of electrical motors, hydraulic systems, and fuel powered engines as well as exploration of a wide range of careers in agricultural mechanics.
Organizational Leadership and Communications:
Organizational Leadership and Communications is an applied-knowledge course for students interested in learning more about the attributes and skills of successful leaders in the Agriculture industry. This course covers organizational behavior, communication, management, and leadership topics. Students in this course participate in activities that will assist them in the development of communication and interpersonal skills transferrable to any agribusiness application.
Food Science and Safety:
Food Science and Safety is an applied-knowledge course designed for students interested in food science. The course covers fundamental principles of food science, food safety and sanitation, foodborne pathogens, and food-related standards and regulations. Upon completion of this course, students will be versed in the technical knowledge and skills necessary for further education and careers in food science.
Principles of Plant Science:
Principles of Plant Science and Hydroculture focuses on essential knowledge and skills related to the science of plant growth. This course covers principles of plant health, growth, reproduction, and biotechnology, as well as fundamental principles of hydroponics and aquaponics.
Greenhouse Management:
Greenhouse Management is an applied-knowledge course designed to prepare students to manage greenhouse operations. This course covers principles of greenhouse structures, plant health and growth, growing media, greenhouse crop selection and propagation, and management techniques. It provides students with the technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in horticulture production.
Landscaping and Turf Science:
Landscaping and Turf Science is a applied-knowledge course designed to provide challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed for further education and careers in landscape design, maintenance, and turf management. Content includes site analysis and planning, principles of design, and plant selection and care techniques.
Environmental and Natural Resource Management:
Environmental and Natural Resource Management is an applied-knowledge course for students interested in learning more about becoming good stewards of our environment and natural resources, as an environmental scientist, conservationist, forester, or wildlife manager. This course covers major types of natural resources and their management, public policy, the role of public education in managing resources, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry.
Law Enforcement Services:
Criminal Justice I:
Criminal Justice I serves as a comprehensive survey of how the law enforcement, legal, and correctional systems interact with each other in the United States. Current issues will be researched in the context of local, state, and federal laws. Investigative skills will be developed in the areas of drug use, incident documentation and basic crime scene investigation. Additionally, upon completion of the course, students will understand the importance of communications and professionalism in law enforcement.
Criminal Justice II:
Criminal Justice II is an integrated survey of the law and justice systems for students interested in pursuing careers in law enforcement and legal services. From initial crisis scenario management to arrest, transport, trial, and corrections, procedures and laws governing the application of justice in the United States are examined in detail, with special emphasis on the best practices and professional traits required of law enforcement and legal professionals. This course prepares students for advanced work in crime scene analysis and forensic science, and offers strong knowledge and skill preparation for postsecondary or career opportunities in associated fields.
Criminal Justice III:
Criminal Justice III: Investigations is the final course designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to be successful in the sciences of criminal investigations. Students will learn terminology and investigation skills related to the crime scene, aspects of criminal behavior, and applications of the scientific inquiry to solve crimes. By utilizing the scientific inquiry method, students will obtain and analyze evidence through simulated crime scenes and evaluation of case studies. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to identify careers forensic science and criminology, summarize the laws that govern the application of forensic science, and draw key connections between the history of the forensic science system and the modern legal system.
Automotive Collision Repair:
Transportation Core:
Transportation Core course prepares students for entry into all subsequent transportation courses. Students explore career opportunities and requirements of a professional service technician. Content emphasizes beginning transportation service skills and workplace success skills. Students study safety, tools, equipment, shop operations, basic engine fundamentals, and basic technician skills. Upon completing this course students may enter automotive service technology, diesel equipment maintenance technology, 2-4 cycle engine service technology, collision repair and refinish technology, or aviation maintenance.
Collision Repair: Non-Structural:
Collision Repair: Non-Structural is a course that prepares students to analyze non-structural collision damage to a vehicle, determine the extent of the damage and the direction of impact, initiate an appropriate repair plan, and correctly use equipment to fit metal to a specified dimension within tolerances. Course content includes metal finishing, body filling, and glass panel replacements. The course prepares students for entry level employment and advanced training in collision repair technology, and post-secondary education.
Collision Repair: Structural:
Painting and Refinishing is a course that prepares students to use plastics and adhesives in the repair and refinish processes and to apply automotive paint to a vehicle. Students learn to diagnose automotive paint finish problems and to perform the appropriate manufacturer-required techniques and processes to refinish the affected area or the complete vehicle. Course content provides the student with training in mixing, matching, and applying paint and finish to vehicles. Course content includes the application of plastics and adhesives in the repair and refinish processes. The course prepares students for entry level employment and advanced training in collision repair technology, and post-secondary education.
Visual Art 1
Students in visual arts courses will create, evaluate, and research the historical context of works of art. The students will apply various media, techniques, and processes in the creation and analysis of artworks. Students, through practice and sequential study, will strive to achieve technical mastery in the areas of art production, art criticism, aesthetics, and art history. As students progress through courses in the area of visual art, they will develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. These skills are gleaned from the study of ideas, concepts, issues, and knowledge related to the visual arts.
Foundations of Fashion
Foundations of Fashion Design introduces students to the rich history of the fashion industry and the basic design principles that are integral to its operation. This course studies the history of the fashion industry, elements and principles of design, textile history and composition, as well as basic construction principles. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study.
Fashion Design
Fashion Design is an applied-knowledge course intended to prepare students to pursue careers in the fashion industry. Building on the knowledge acquired in Foundations of Fashion Design, this course places special emphasis on apparel manufacturing and merchandising, marketing applications, product and service management, and the creation of an original fashion collection. In addition, students will explore trends in fashion design and engage with industry-specific technologies used to produce a variety of fabrics, garments, and accessories.
Social Health Services:
Intro to Human Studies
Introduction to Human Studies is a foundational course for students interested in becoming a public advocate, social worker, dietician, nutritionist, counselor, or community volunteer. This course covers the history of counseling, career investigation, stress management, mental illness, communication, and the counseling process. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study.
Life Span Development
Lifespan Development builds basic knowledge in human growth and development. The course standards include developmental theory, principles of growth, behavior of children from conception through adolescence, adult development and aging, and death and dying. Artifacts will be created for inclusion in a portfolio, which will continue to build throughout the program of study.
Human Studies
Family Studies
Family Studies is an applied knowledge course that examines the diversity and evolving structure of the modern family. Course standards focus on the demographic, historical, and social changes of interpersonal relationships, as well as parenting, and the effect of stressors on the family.
Human Service Practicum
Human Services Practicum is a capstone course in the human services cluster that provides a practicum experience for students as they develop an understanding of professional and ethical issues. The capstone course will be based on the knowledge and skills from previous courses in the human services cluster. The essential knowledge and skills of these courses include communication, critical thinking, problem solving, information technology, ethical and legal responsibilities, leadership, and teamwork.
Design and Pre-Construction:
Computer- Aided Drafting I :
Computer Aided Drafting I is a course in which students learn the basic concepts of scale drawings and orthographic projections by making simple two- and three-dimensional drawings using manual drafting tools and computer-aided drafting (CAD). Course content will enable students to make the transition into the use of CAD software by having them make increasingly sophisticated drawings. Student work in teams will culminate in a class project to create a complete set of construction and assembly drawings for a mechanical product.
Computer- Aided Drafting II :
Therapeutic Clinical Services:
Health Science Education:
Health Science Education is an introductory course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of biotechnology research, therapeutics, health informatics, diagnostics, and support services. Upon completion of this course, a student proficient in Health Science Education will be able to identify careers in these fields, compare and contrast the features of healthcare systems, explain the legal and ethical ramifications of the healthcare setting, and begin to perform foundational healthcare skills. This course will serve as a strong foundation for all of the health science programs of study.
Medical Therapeutics:
Medical Therapeutics is an applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in therapeutic services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in therapeutics services; assess, monitor, evaluate, and report patient/client health status; and identify the purpose and components of treatments. The student will incorporate communication, goal setting, and information collection skills to be successful in the workplace.
Rehabilitation Careers:
Rehabilitation Careers is an applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in rehabilitation services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in rehabilitation services. The successful student will recognize diseases, disorders or injuries related to rehabilitation services and correlate the related anatomy and physiology then develop a plan of treatment with appropriate modalities. The student will incorporate communication, goal setting, and information collection skills to be successful in the workplace.
Personal Care Services:
Principles of Cosmetology:
Principles of Cosmetology is the first level of cosmetology, and it prepares students with work-related skills for advancement into the Design Principles of Cosmetology course. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire basic fundamental skills in both theory and practical applications of leadership and interpersonal skill development. Content stresses safety, environmental issues, and protection of the public and designers as integrated with principles of hair design, nail structure, and cosmetic procedures. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the cosmetology industry.
Design Principles of Cosmetology:
Design Principles of Cosmetology is the second level of cosmetology and prepares students fro work- related skills and advancement into the Chemistry of Cosmetology course. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills in both theory and practical application. Advanced knowledge and skills in hair design, nail artistry, and cosmetic applications will be enhanced in a laboratory setting, which duplicates cosmetology industry standards. Upon completion and acquisition of 600 hours, students are eligible to take the Tennessee Board of Cosmetology manicuring examination for a Tennessee Manicure License.
Chemistry of Cosmetology:
Chemistry of Cosmetology is the advanced level of cosmetology and it prepares students to perform work-related services using chemicals in the cosmetology industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire foundation skills in both theory and practical applications. Laboratory facilities and experiences will be used to simulate cosmetology work experiences. Upon completion and acquisition of 1,500 hours, students are eligible to take the Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology examination for a Tennessee Cosmetology License. Upon completion and acquisition of 600 hours, students are eligible to take the Tennessee State Board of Cosmetology Manicuring examination for a Tennessee Manicuring License.
Engineering and Technology:
Foundations of Technology:
Pre-requisite: Currently enrolled in Algebra I
Foundations of Technology prepare students to understand and apply technological concepts and processes that are the cornerstone for the high school technology program. Group and individual activities engage students in crating ideas, developing innovations, and engineering practical solutions. Technology content, resources, and laboratory/class-room activities apply student applications to science, mathematics and other school subjects in authentic situations. This course will focus on the three dimensions of technological literacy: knowledge, ways of thinking and acting, and capabilities, with the goal of students developing the characteristics of technologically literate citizens. It will employ teaching/learning strategies that enable students to build their own understanding of new ideas. It is designed to engage students in exploring and deepening their understanding of engineering and make use of a variety of assessment instruments to reveal the extent of understanding.
Technological Issues:
Pre-requisite: Foundations of Technology
Recommended Pre-requisites: Algebra I and enrolled in Geometry
This course contributes to the development of each high school student’s capability to make responsible judgments about technology’s development, control and use. Critiquing appropriate technology and sustainable development are important. The structure of the course brings discussions of technological values so that students can reflect and develop their own ethical standards. Students are actively involved in the organized and integrated application of technological resources, engineering concepts, and scientific procedures. Students address the complexities of technology and issues that stem from designing, developing, using and assessing technological systems. In developing a functional understanding of technology, students comprehend how human conditions, current affairs, and personal preferences drive technological design and problem solving. This course will actively engage student in making and developing, using, and managing technology systems. Students will better understand the role of systems in meeting specific needs and will be able to analyze and understand the behavior and operation of basic technological systems in different contexts. Students will investigate critical historical and emerging issues affecting the creation, development, use, and control of technology. They will use case studies, simulations, research, design and problem solving, and group discussions and presentation to address complex issues and propose alternative solutions to technological developments. Local, regional and global governmental, social, and economic policies concerning technology are also studied.
Advanced Design Applications:
Recommended Pre-requisites: Algebra I, Geometry and Physical Science
This course has been designed as an advanced study for students engaged in themed academies and general technology studies that lead to the capacity to understand how technology’s development, control and use is based on design constraints, and human wants and needs. The structure of the course challenges students to use design processes so that they can think, plan, design and create solutions to engineering and technological problems. Students are actively involved in the organized an integrated application of technological resources, engineering concepts, and scientific procedures.
Engineering Design:
Recommended Pre-requisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Biology I, Chemistry I, and enrolled in Physics
This course is a capstone or AP level course that will include high school seniors who intend to continue their education in sciences, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) at the post-secondary level, especially a four-five year baccalaureate degree. Students will study engineering concepts and will develop a prototype in teams and defend their project-based design with mathematically, scientific and technological research and data. This course will maintain a focus on how engineers apply their creativity, resourcefulness, mathematical, scientific, and technical knowledge and skills in the creation or refinement of technological products/systems. A key approach will be the employment of a sophisticated, sequential, and iterative design and development process to solve authentic engineering tasks/problems using Project-based Learning.
Other Electives:
ACT Prep:
ACT Prep is a course designed to assist students in becoming more knowledgeable about the format and question style of the ACT College Entrance exam. Students will practice examples of questions on the ACT to better develop skills in the content being measured, learn about navigating the actstudent.org website, and become familiar with test-taking strategies.
Driver’s Education:
Driver’s education is a course designed to help students gain basic skills for operating a motor vehicle safely. During the course, a student should complete 30 hours of classroom instruction, six hours behind the wheel of a car, and eighteen hours of observation in driving. The student should be sixteen within 180 days of the completion of the course.
Financial Planning:
This course is designed to develop skills in the use of financial pri nciples in making business decisions. Students will research job qualifications and employment opportunities in finance. The course includes a study of the allocation of financial resources, the effects of finance and credit institutions on the business community and the impact of financial decisions on the consumer market. Ethical issues will be presented in this course.
Math in the Movies:
The goal of this course is to motivate students to become interested and engage in mathematics. Through television and movies, students will have the opportunity to see and practice new applications for the skills learned in Algebra and Geometry.